Matthias Hüser, MSc. ETH Computer Science

"Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn’t go away." -- Philip K. Dick (1928-1982)

PhD Student

E-Mail
matthias.hueser@get-your-addresses-elsewhere.inf.ethz.ch
Phone
+41 44 632 23 71
Address
ETH Zürich
Department of Computer Science
Biomedical Informatics Group
Universitätsstrasse 6
8092 Zürich
Room
CAB F53.1

I am broadly interested in Machine Learning and Signal Processing for Healthcare, in particular the application of Deep Learning and Bayesian non-parametric methods to EHR and genomic data.

Before joining the Rätsch Lab, I studied Computer Science at ETH Zürich (MSc) and Computing at Imperial College London (BEng). Previously I have worked on forecasting intracranial hypertension and cerebral hypoxia events using high-frequency ICU data.

Abstract Our comprehensive analysis of alternative splicing across 32 The Cancer Genome Atlas cancer types from 8,705 patients detects alternative splicing events and tumor variants by reanalyzing RNA and whole-exome sequencing data. Tumors have up to 30% more alternative splicing events than normal samples. Association analysis of somatic variants with alternative splicing events confirmed known trans associations with variants in SF3B1 and U2AF1 and identified additional trans-acting variants (e.g., TADA1, PPP2R1A). Many tumors have thousands of alternative splicing events not detectable in normal samples; on average, we identified ≈930 exon-exon junctions (“neojunctions”) in tumors not typically found in GTEx normals. From Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium data available for breast and ovarian tumor samples, we confirmed ≈1.7 neojunction- and ≈0.6 single nucleotide variant-derived peptides per tumor sample that are also predicted major histocompatibility complex-I binders (“putative neoantigens”).

Authors Andre Kahles, Kjong-Van Lehmann, Nora C. Toussaint, Matthias Hüser, Stefan Stark, Timo Sachsenberg, Oliver Stegle, Oliver Kohlbacher, Chris Sander, Gunnar Rätsch, The Cancer Genome Atlas Research Network

Submitted Cancer Cell

Link DOI

Abstract The deterioration of organ function in ICU patients requires swift response to prevent further damage to vital systems. Focusing on the circulatory system, we build a model to predict if a patient’s state will deteriorate in the near future. We identify circulatory system dys- function using the combination of excess lactic acid in the blood and low mean arterial blood pressure or the presence of vasoactive drugs. Using an observational cohort of 45,000 patients from a Swiss ICU, we extract and process patient time series and identify periods of circulatory system dysfunction to develop an early warning system. We train a gra- dient boosting model to perform binary classification every five minutes on whether the patient will deteriorate during an increasingly large win- dow into the future, up to the duration of a shift (8 hours). The model achieves an AUROC between 0.952 and 0.919 across the prediction win- dows, and an AUPRC between 0.223 and 0.384 for events with positive prevalence between 0.014 and 0.042. We also show preliminary results from a recurrent neural network. These results show that contemporary machine learning approaches combined with careful preprocessing of raw data collected during routine care yield clinically useful predictions in near real time [Workshop Abstract]

Authors Stephanie Hyland, Matthias Hüser, Xinrui Lyu, Martin Faltys, Tobias Merz, Gunnar Rätsch

Submitted Proceedings of the First Joint Workshop on AI in Health

Link

Abstract Human professionals are often required to make decisions based on complex multivariate time series measurements in an online setting, e.g. in health care. Since human cognition is not optimized to work well in high-dimensional spaces, these decisions benefit from interpretable low-dimensional representations. However, many representation learning algorithms for time series data are difficult to interpret. This is due to non-intuitive mappings from data features to salient properties of the representation and non-smoothness over time. To address this problem, we propose to couple a variational autoencoder to a discrete latent space and introduce a topological structure through the use of self-organizing maps. This allows us to learn discrete representations of time series, which give rise to smooth and interpretable embeddings with superior clustering performance. Furthermore, to allow for a probabilistic interpretation of our method, we integrate a Markov model in the latent space. This model uncovers the temporal transition structure, improves clustering performance even further and provides additional explanatory insights as well as a natural representation of uncertainty. We evaluate our model on static (Fashion-)MNIST data, a time series of linearly interpolated (Fashion-)MNIST images, a chaotic Lorenz attractor system with two macro states, as well as on a challenging real world medical time series application. In the latter experiment, our representation uncovers meaningful structure in the acute physiological state of a patient.

Authors Vincent Fortuin, Matthias Hüser, Francesco Locatello, Heiko Strathmann, Gunnar Rätsch

Submitted arXiv Preprints

Link

Authors Valeria De Luca, Matthias Hüser, Martin Jaggi, Walter Karlen, Emanuela Keller

Submitted 16th International Symposium on Intracranial Pressure and Neuromonitoring, Cambridge, MA, USA

Link

Authors Matthias Hüser, Valeria De Luca, Martin Jaggi, Walter Karlen, Emanuela Keller

Submitted Vasospasm - 13th International Conference on Neurovascular Events after Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

Link